{
  "moduleName": "webappitem",
  "name": "Shucks, Its Mollusc Mayhem",
  "url": "/posts/shucks-its-mollusc-mayhem",
  "description": "

Two hundred years ago the mouthful of the ocean was considered a humble snack as they grew in abundance around Sydney harbour. Now oysters have become\n associated with champagne, extravagance and romance, especially in Noosa.

\n

Earlier this year, the first ever exclusive Oyster INdulgence at Café Le Monde had oyster aficionados in bivalve heaven, and others quickly became converts\n - or were they just being coy about suggestions of them being aphrodisiacs. Who knows, but after more than 200 dozen of Australia’s best oysters were\n slurped, sucked and savoured with shrieks of pure delight, washed down with fine wine, and music turned up for the after-party, the verdict was unanimous.\n It was a night of sheer INdulgence worth repeating and many called for it to become an annual event.

\n

PEOPLE POWER WINS AGAIN!

\n

Book Friday 15 February 2019 for the next Café Le Monde and IN Noosa Magazine Oyster INdulgence which promises to be bigger than the last. Head Chef Oliver\n Carruthers and his team will shuck it and rock it with a continuous menu including oysters kombucha granita; oysters Rockefeller with garlic, Pernod\n and parsley butter; oysters with native finger lime Venetian dressing; Oyster po boy, a deep fried oyster slider with lettuce, hot sauce; oyster verdita\n shooter with Tequila, pineapple, jalapeno and coriander; smoked oyster chowder; steamed oysters with soy ginger and mirin; oysters Kilpatrick with\n voodoo bacon and hot sauce; also hand-cut duck fat fries, smoked garlic and miso aioli; Tanglewood bread and Pepe Saya butter.

\n

The wines, many organic and biodynamic will be sensational. Heading the list is Central Otago’s Quartz Reef Methode Traditionnelle, a wine of distinction,\n made by winemakers Rudi Bauer and Jarred Whinham in the traditional method to achieve elegance and finesse with beautiful balance and length.

\n

\n Quartz Reef, in the heart of Central Otago, also specialises in creating exceptional Pinot Noir and Pinot Gris.

\n

Named after New Zealand’s largest quartz rock deposit that underlies the company’s vineyards at Bendigo Central Otago, Quartz Reef wines exhibit a symphony\n of flavours that set out to really capture attention.

\n

DID YOU KNOW?

\n

Aboriginals and Torres Strait Islanders thrived on oysters long before white settlement.

\n

There are three species of oysters: The Sydney rock oyster is found from Lakes Entrance in Victoria to Hervey Bay in Queensland. It has a small shell and\n a big, rich, creamy flavour.

\n

The larger Pacific oyster is native to Japan. It was introduced to Western Australia, South Australia and Tasmania in the 1950s. It is plump and has a\n fresh, salty flavour The native flat oyster, also known as the southern Belon, mud oyster or more commonly the Angasi, is the largest of our oysters.\n Its shell is flat and can be the size of a dinner plate.

\n

The flavour can withstand almost any accompaniment and deep fried if so desired.

", "releaseDate": "2018-12-01T00:00:00", "expiryDate": "2099-01-01T00:00:00", "lastUpdateDate": "2018-12-21T10:31:23.357", "classifications": "", "weight": null, "commentCount": 0, "itemId": 8196672, "address1": "", "address2": "", "city": "", "state": "", "zipcode": "", "country": "AU", "latitude": null, "longitude": null, "isEnabled": true, "submittedBy": "", "ownedBy": "", "ownedByCallout": "", "class": "", "style": "", "javascript": "", "tags": "", "summary": "

There's nothing like quite like slurping down the briny glory of plump, freshly-shucked oysters served in eight different ways, says Helen Flanagan.

", "image0": "/images/uploads/shucks-its-mollusc-mayhem.jpg", "imageN": "", "attachment0": "", "attachmentN": "", "urls": "", "videourls": "", "audiourls": "", "eventTime": "", "eventDate": "", "displayName": "", "quote": "", "emails": "", "contacts": "", "isSponsored": false, "module-photogallery": "", "releaseDates": "1/9/18", "crmID": "", "images": "", "category": "eat-drink,", "isDraft": false, "terms": "", "relatedPosts": "", "isFeature": false, "imageCredits": "", "urlWithHost": "http://innoosamagazine.com.au/posts/shucks-its-mollusc-mayhem", "sitehost_1": { "moduleName": "sitehost", "siteHost": "innoosamagazine.com.au" }, "oid_2": { "moduleName": "oid", "oid": "8196672" }, "otype_3": { "moduleName": "otype", "otype": "35" }, "eid_4": { "moduleName": "eid", "eid": "0" }, "cid_5": { "moduleName": "cid", "cid": "0" }, "globals": { "get": { "ID": "8196672" }, "cookie": { "visitorDeviceClass": "desktop", "ASP.NET_SessionId": "upkqhjcehmpqi5zcg1ahjmln" }, "site": { "id": 1663765, "name": "In Noosa Magazine", "host": "innoosamagazine.com.au", "countryCode": "AU", "language": "EN", "dateNow": "2019-02-20T15:06:15.3957633" }, "visitor": { "deviceClass": "desktop", "ip": "34.228.115.216", "country": "US", "city": "Ashburn", "userAgent": "CCBot/2.0 (https://commoncrawl.org/faq/)", "referrer": "/" }, "cart": { "cartUrl": "/OrderRetrievev2.aspx?CatalogueID=0" }, "user": { "entityId": 0, "firstname": "", "middleName": "", "lastname": "", "fullname": "", "username": "", "email": "", "email2": "", "email3": "", "customerType": {}, "leadSourceType": {}, "industryType": {}, "ratingType": {}, "isWholesaler": false, "isLoggedIn": false } }, "visitordeviceclass_6": { "moduleName": "visitordeviceclass", "moduleDescriptor": { "templatePath": null, "parameters": "", "apiEndpoint": "/api/v3/visitordeviceclass", "objectType": -1, "objectId": -1, "adminUrl": "" }, "deviceClass": "desktop" }, "visitordeviceclass_7": { "moduleName": "visitordeviceclass", "moduleDescriptor": { "templatePath": null, "parameters": "", "apiEndpoint": "/api/v3/visitordeviceclass", "objectType": -1, "objectId": -1, "adminUrl": "" }, "deviceClass": "desktop" }, "sitename_8": { "moduleName": "sitename", "moduleDescriptor": { "templatePath": null, "parameters": "", "apiEndpoint": "/api/v3/sitename", "objectType": -1, "objectId": -1, "adminUrl": "" }, "sitename": "In Noosa Magazine" }, "sitename_9": { "moduleName": "sitename", "moduleDescriptor": { "templatePath": null, "parameters": "", "apiEndpoint": "/api/v3/sitename", "objectType": -1, "objectId": -1, "adminUrl": "" }, "sitename": "In Noosa Magazine" }, "waOwner": { "moduleName": "webapps", "moduleDescriptor": { "templatePath": "/Layouts/WebApps/Authors/list.html", "parameters": "render=\"collection\",id=\"Authors\",filter=\"item\",itemid=\"\",collection=\"waOwner\",template=\"\"", "apiEndpoint": "/api/v3/webapps", "objectType": 34, "objectId": -1, "adminUrl": "/Admin/CustomContent_ItemList.aspx?CustomContentID=-1" }, "items": [], "pagination": { "currentPage": 1, "itemsPerPage": 500, "numberOfPages": 0, "totalItemsCount": 0, "previousPageUrl": null, "nextPageUrl": null }, "params": { "render": "collection", "id": "Authors", "filter": "item", "itemid": "", "collection": "waOwner", "template": "" } } }

Shucks, Its Mollusc Mayhem

There's nothing like quite like slurping down the briny glory of plump, freshly-shucked oysters served in eight different ways, says Helen Flanagan.

Two hundred years ago the mouthful of the ocean was considered a humble snack as they grew in abundance around Sydney harbour. Now oysters have become associated with champagne, extravagance and romance, especially in Noosa.

Earlier this year, the first ever exclusive Oyster INdulgence at Café Le Monde had oyster aficionados in bivalve heaven, and others quickly became converts - or were they just being coy about suggestions of them being aphrodisiacs. Who knows, but after more than 200 dozen of Australia’s best oysters were slurped, sucked and savoured with shrieks of pure delight, washed down with fine wine, and music turned up for the after-party, the verdict was unanimous. It was a night of sheer INdulgence worth repeating and many called for it to become an annual event.

PEOPLE POWER WINS AGAIN!

Book Friday 15 February 2019 for the next Café Le Monde and IN Noosa Magazine Oyster INdulgence which promises to be bigger than the last. Head Chef Oliver Carruthers and his team will shuck it and rock it with a continuous menu including oysters kombucha granita; oysters Rockefeller with garlic, Pernod and parsley butter; oysters with native finger lime Venetian dressing; Oyster po boy, a deep fried oyster slider with lettuce, hot sauce; oyster verdita shooter with Tequila, pineapple, jalapeno and coriander; smoked oyster chowder; steamed oysters with soy ginger and mirin; oysters Kilpatrick with voodoo bacon and hot sauce; also hand-cut duck fat fries, smoked garlic and miso aioli; Tanglewood bread and Pepe Saya butter.

The wines, many organic and biodynamic will be sensational. Heading the list is Central Otago’s Quartz Reef Methode Traditionnelle, a wine of distinction, made by winemakers Rudi Bauer and Jarred Whinham in the traditional method to achieve elegance and finesse with beautiful balance and length.

Quartz Reef, in the heart of Central Otago, also specialises in creating exceptional Pinot Noir and Pinot Gris.

Named after New Zealand’s largest quartz rock deposit that underlies the company’s vineyards at Bendigo Central Otago, Quartz Reef wines exhibit a symphony of flavours that set out to really capture attention.

DID YOU KNOW?

Aboriginals and Torres Strait Islanders thrived on oysters long before white settlement.

There are three species of oysters: The Sydney rock oyster is found from Lakes Entrance in Victoria to Hervey Bay in Queensland. It has a small shell and a big, rich, creamy flavour.

The larger Pacific oyster is native to Japan. It was introduced to Western Australia, South Australia and Tasmania in the 1950s. It is plump and has a fresh, salty flavour The native flat oyster, also known as the southern Belon, mud oyster or more commonly the Angasi, is the largest of our oysters. Its shell is flat and can be the size of a dinner plate.

The flavour can withstand almost any accompaniment and deep fried if so desired.

Hashtag #InNoosaMag

 

So don't forget to tag us while you're enjoying Noosa!