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INVALUABLE VOLUNTEERS

\n

According to annual data, lifesavers patrolled for a whopping 16,127 hours in total throughout 2017/18 year equating to $483,000 in value. The volunteers\n helped to take care of the more than 334,000 annual visitors to Noosa Main Beach and 11,000 visitors at Peregian Beach.

\n

Per quarter, the Noosa Coast Guard uses over $8,300 in fuel to carry out over 30 rescues. Radio operators engage in about 5600 transmissions and take on\n regular 24-hour shifts.

\n

THE SEA

\n

On a hot spring day, I sit with Roger Aspinall from the Noosa Heads Surf Club under the cover of the timber deck. While responding to my questions, Roger\n keeps a keen eye on the sand and ocean, proving an unwavering dedication to his volunteer role as Club Captain and Director of Lifesaving.

\n

It was while finding an outlet for his love of ocean ski paddling that Roger found himself at Noosa’s iconic surf club.

\n

Becoming a lifesaver was never part of Roger’s plan but he has now served the club and community for more than seven years. “After I got into it in the\n first year, I really enjoyed it. It was something different, something I hadn’t done before,” he says.

\n

Active members are required to patrol both Noosa and Peregian beaches for about 45-hours per season from September through to May. Lifesavers cover patrols\n on the weekends and public holidays.

\n

There are 14 Noosa patrol teams and six teams that patrol Peregian Beach, plus ocean support teams that cover the vast expanse of coastline on the IRB\n (Inflatable Rescue Boat) and jet skis. Roger does all of this, plus keep a day job working with Doonan’s House with No Steps as the Service Delivery\n Supervisor, helping disabled people access employment.

\n

THE LAND

\n

On the land, there are volunteers at the ready to tackle any disasters this summer season, such as the State Emergency Service (SES) often called out in\n storms to help those in danger.

\n

New to the Noosa SES squad is Warren Kuskopf, 58, who said he is looking forward to assisting the community this summer.

\n

There is an SES team based in Tewantin, Corooy, Pomona and Boreen Point made up of men and women from just 18-yearsold to almost 80. The teams gather every\n Monday night to train for any kind of disaster they might face this season. Warren has a history of volunteering but says he has never been a part\n of a group that is so well respected.

\n

“I could be out just getting a coffee on my way back from training and people will say ‘good on you!’” he says. “It makes you quite proud that people think\n so highly of the SES.” Keeping the rural properties safe this season are the band of dedicated Rural Fire Brigade officers. Noosa North Shore First\n Officer Michael Hancock has served the local area for 18-years.

\n

For Michael, who has a long history of volunteer work with organisations such as Meals on Wheels and op shops, serving as a volunteer fire fighter is a\n chance to give back to the community.

\n

Michael recently turned 71 and admits volunteering is also an opportunity to feel like a useful member of society.

\n

“I get something out of it,” he says. “When you’re older, it helps your selfesteem. You feel like you are contributing to the community. You’re not just\n a useless old man sitting in a rocking chair. This keeps me young and my mind active.”

\n

Sadly, Michael’s home was one of three lost in the devastating fires of 2016, but he says it was the kindness of the local community that inspired him\n to continue serving in the brigade.

\n

This humble fire fighter refuses to be called a hero, instead urging us to reserve that phrase for people who risk their lives for others.

\n

Instead, Michael thinks of himself as simply a good Samaritan who wants to give back to the community that showed him kindness and compassion when his\n life was literally in ashes.

\n

Playing a key role in helping Noosa locals and visitors stay safe is the Noosa Council Disaster Dashboard.

\n

The dashboard alerts residents and visitors to potential emergencies in the surrounding area from power outages to weather warnings and road conditions.

\n

\n You can get ready for the summer season with a few simple steps:

\n
    \n
  • Prepare your Emergency Plan
  • \n
  • Put together an Emergency Kit
  • \n
  • Prepare your home for floods & fires
  • \n
  • Tune into warnings online and the radio
  • \n
\n

Visit www.disaster.noosa.qld.gov.au to find out more details about keeping safe this storm season.\n To be prepared for an emergency situation visit noosa.qld.gov.au/getting-ready\n

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From the land to the sea, there is an army of volunteers dedicating their time to making sure we can all safely enjoy this glorious region. Jolene Ogle\n chats to just a handful to find out what it's like to be on the front line.

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Local Heros

From the land to the sea, there is an army of volunteers dedicating their time to making sure we can all safely enjoy this glorious region. Jolene Ogle chats to just a handful to find out what it's like to be on the front line.

INVALUABLE VOLUNTEERS

According to annual data, lifesavers patrolled for a whopping 16,127 hours in total throughout 2017/18 year equating to $483,000 in value. The volunteers helped to take care of the more than 334,000 annual visitors to Noosa Main Beach and 11,000 visitors at Peregian Beach.

Per quarter, the Noosa Coast Guard uses over $8,300 in fuel to carry out over 30 rescues. Radio operators engage in about 5600 transmissions and take on regular 24-hour shifts.

THE SEA

On a hot spring day, I sit with Roger Aspinall from the Noosa Heads Surf Club under the cover of the timber deck. While responding to my questions, Roger keeps a keen eye on the sand and ocean, proving an unwavering dedication to his volunteer role as Club Captain and Director of Lifesaving.

It was while finding an outlet for his love of ocean ski paddling that Roger found himself at Noosa’s iconic surf club.

Becoming a lifesaver was never part of Roger’s plan but he has now served the club and community for more than seven years. “After I got into it in the first year, I really enjoyed it. It was something different, something I hadn’t done before,” he says.

Active members are required to patrol both Noosa and Peregian beaches for about 45-hours per season from September through to May. Lifesavers cover patrols on the weekends and public holidays.

There are 14 Noosa patrol teams and six teams that patrol Peregian Beach, plus ocean support teams that cover the vast expanse of coastline on the IRB (Inflatable Rescue Boat) and jet skis. Roger does all of this, plus keep a day job working with Doonan’s House with No Steps as the Service Delivery Supervisor, helping disabled people access employment.

THE LAND

On the land, there are volunteers at the ready to tackle any disasters this summer season, such as the State Emergency Service (SES) often called out in storms to help those in danger.

New to the Noosa SES squad is Warren Kuskopf, 58, who said he is looking forward to assisting the community this summer.

There is an SES team based in Tewantin, Corooy, Pomona and Boreen Point made up of men and women from just 18-yearsold to almost 80. The teams gather every Monday night to train for any kind of disaster they might face this season. Warren has a history of volunteering but says he has never been a part of a group that is so well respected.

“I could be out just getting a coffee on my way back from training and people will say ‘good on you!’” he says. “It makes you quite proud that people think so highly of the SES.” Keeping the rural properties safe this season are the band of dedicated Rural Fire Brigade officers. Noosa North Shore First Officer Michael Hancock has served the local area for 18-years.

For Michael, who has a long history of volunteer work with organisations such as Meals on Wheels and op shops, serving as a volunteer fire fighter is a chance to give back to the community.

Michael recently turned 71 and admits volunteering is also an opportunity to feel like a useful member of society.

“I get something out of it,” he says. “When you’re older, it helps your selfesteem. You feel like you are contributing to the community. You’re not just a useless old man sitting in a rocking chair. This keeps me young and my mind active.”

Sadly, Michael’s home was one of three lost in the devastating fires of 2016, but he says it was the kindness of the local community that inspired him to continue serving in the brigade.

This humble fire fighter refuses to be called a hero, instead urging us to reserve that phrase for people who risk their lives for others.

Instead, Michael thinks of himself as simply a good Samaritan who wants to give back to the community that showed him kindness and compassion when his life was literally in ashes.

Playing a key role in helping Noosa locals and visitors stay safe is the Noosa Council Disaster Dashboard.

The dashboard alerts residents and visitors to potential emergencies in the surrounding area from power outages to weather warnings and road conditions.

You can get ready for the summer season with a few simple steps:

  • Prepare your Emergency Plan
  • Put together an Emergency Kit
  • Prepare your home for floods & fires
  • Tune into warnings online and the radio

Visit www.disaster.noosa.qld.gov.au to find out more details about keeping safe this storm season. To be prepared for an emergency situation visit noosa.qld.gov.au/getting-ready

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