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It’s not often we think of food as facing extinction. Mass production and processing techniques imply we will always have food on the table, but the team\n at Slow Food headquarters in Italy are busy cataloguing foods that belong to the culture and traditions of the whole world and which are at risk of\n disappearing.

\n

Launched in 1996, the Ark of Taste project has since since catalogued 4,701 products and foods from around the world, including 62 from Australia, with\n another 938 nominations pending.

\n

The Ark of Taste travels the world collating small-scale quality productions that belong to the cultures, history and traditions of the entire planet:\n an extraordinary heritage of fruits, vegetables, animal breeds, cheeses, breads, sweets and cured meats.

\n

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations estimates that 75 per cent of domestic vegetable varieties have been permanently lost; sadly,\n the figure rises to as high as 95 per cent in the United States.

\n

Now, 60 per cent of global food supplies are based on just three cereals: wheat, rice and corn – and unfortunately, not on the thousands of varieties of\n rice selected by farmers which were at one time grown in India and China, or the thousands of corn varieties which used to be grown in Mexico; but\n just a few hybrids selected and sold to farmers by a handful of multinationals.

\n

The Ark was created to point out the existence of these products, draw attention to the risk of their extinction within a few generations and invite everyone\n to take action to help protect them.

\n

In some cases, rescue is in the form of buying and consuming the endangered foods; in some by telling their story and supporting their producers; and in\n others, such as the case of endangered wild species, this might mean eating less or none of them in order to preserve them and favour their reproduction.

\n

In Australia, the Ark of Taste reflects our country's vast landscape of diverse climates, cultures and unique flora and fauna - from Queensland's native\n Bunya nut to Victoria's heritage pear varieties and the Bull Boar sausage – which is a beef and pork sausage produced by the Italian-speaking Swiss\n population of the Victorian Gold Fields since the 1850s.

\n

Particularly important for the Australian Ark are foods from the traditional diets of indigenous Australians and cultures, such as the Pindan walnut from\n Western Australia and Finger limes from Australia’s East Coast.

\n

These wild foods reflect not only exciting and largely unknown nutritional and flavour profiles, but also the great importance of cultural knowledge and\n landscapes and the passing on of that knowledge.

\n

For Slow Food Noosa, they hope to add many more unique flora and fauna to the Ark in order to prevent losing them forever.

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Noah built an ark to save the animals, a group of committed food-protectors are busy building an ark to preserve some of the world’s native foods that are at risk of disappearing. From the better-known bunya nut to the lesser known honeypot ant and Coles’ Wattle, Slow Food is on a quest to save our foods from extinction.

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All Aboard The Ark Of Taste!

Noah built an ark to save the animals, a group of committed food-protectors are busy building an ark to preserve some of the world’s native foods that are at risk of disappearing. From the better-known bunya nut to the lesser known honeypot ant and Coles’ Wattle, Slow Food is on a quest to save our foods from extinction.

It’s not often we think of food as facing extinction. Mass production and processing techniques imply we will always have food on the table, but the team at Slow Food headquarters in Italy are busy cataloguing foods that belong to the culture and traditions of the whole world and which are at risk of disappearing.

Launched in 1996, the Ark of Taste project has since since catalogued 4,701 products and foods from around the world, including 62 from Australia, with another 938 nominations pending.

The Ark of Taste travels the world collating small-scale quality productions that belong to the cultures, history and traditions of the entire planet: an extraordinary heritage of fruits, vegetables, animal breeds, cheeses, breads, sweets and cured meats.

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations estimates that 75 per cent of domestic vegetable varieties have been permanently lost; sadly, the figure rises to as high as 95 per cent in the United States.

Now, 60 per cent of global food supplies are based on just three cereals: wheat, rice and corn – and unfortunately, not on the thousands of varieties of rice selected by farmers which were at one time grown in India and China, or the thousands of corn varieties which used to be grown in Mexico; but just a few hybrids selected and sold to farmers by a handful of multinationals.

The Ark was created to point out the existence of these products, draw attention to the risk of their extinction within a few generations and invite everyone to take action to help protect them.

In some cases, rescue is in the form of buying and consuming the endangered foods; in some by telling their story and supporting their producers; and in others, such as the case of endangered wild species, this might mean eating less or none of them in order to preserve them and favour their reproduction.

In Australia, the Ark of Taste reflects our country's vast landscape of diverse climates, cultures and unique flora and fauna - from Queensland's native Bunya nut to Victoria's heritage pear varieties and the Bull Boar sausage – which is a beef and pork sausage produced by the Italian-speaking Swiss population of the Victorian Gold Fields since the 1850s.

Particularly important for the Australian Ark are foods from the traditional diets of indigenous Australians and cultures, such as the Pindan walnut from Western Australia and Finger limes from Australia’s East Coast.

These wild foods reflect not only exciting and largely unknown nutritional and flavour profiles, but also the great importance of cultural knowledge and landscapes and the passing on of that knowledge.

For Slow Food Noosa, they hope to add many more unique flora and fauna to the Ark in order to prevent losing them forever.

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